Proof of Work #51

Making Alice Grin Again, economics of coin launches

Hello from Boston, where the weather is so cold that as a San Franciscan I’m unwilling to even look at the thermometer.

For those who just joined us, Grin is a new cryptocurrency that implements the Mimblewimble protocol described in an anonymous paper dropped into the #bitcoin-wizards IRC chat in 2016 by one Tom Elvis Jedusor, and later refined by Bitcoin’s own Andrew Poelstra. There’s a lot of excitement around it for a few reasons.

First, it’s one of the first truly interesting coins to be launched with no investors, no premine, no ICO, and no founder’s reward. Launching a new coin can be extremely lucrative for founders, even in a marginal outcome—completely forgoing this financial reward turns a lot of heads.

Second, it’s being implemented by a team of mostly pseudonymous people, with a development culture that seems similar to Bitcoins.

Third, from a technical perspective there are some real benefits to MW from a scalability perspective, and Grin has a unique approach to privacy that differs from the two leading privacy coins (Zcash and Monero) in ways that may prove useful. There have been a ton of great technical overviews, so I won’t rehash that here.

One thing that’s interesting is that unlike Bitcoin, which was so maligned and ignored at launch that Satoshi had to mine by himself on a single Intel CPU for most of 2009, there is (by our conservative estimates) 100 million dollars of mostly VC money invested into special-purpose investment vehicles to mine Grin. This does a lot of weird things: it turns a bunch of people who would have been buyers of grin into sellers of it, it changes the composition of the early holder roster, and it means the chain will launch with an extremely high degree of security via high PoW hashrate. What Bitcoin pulled off, an organic launch without any professional investment early on, is unlikely to ever be possible again.

Despite the big amount of professional investor interest in Grin, the community itself is the closest thing I’ve seen to how the early Bitcoin community felt. The lack of a premine does magic things to human psychology; when you are doing free work for something that someone else gave themselves a huge bag of, you feel like a chump! When you do free work for something that everyone has a fair chance to mine, you feel like you’re part of a tribe, and that effect is in full swing with Grin. Wallets, decentralized exchanges, stats pages etc are all popping up, and our Grin community channel has smart devs asking what they can build every day.

Due to the interactive transaction format, the biggest exchanges will probably take a while to list Grin—currently anyone wanting to get Grin exposure will have a few options:

  1. You can pre-register on galleon.exchange, the world’s first Grin exchange, (disclosure, we’re investors and are big fans of this team) and will be able to buy and sell Grin immediately at launch.

  2. I wanted to offer some decentralized easy-to-use methods of getting some Grin here, but none appear to be quite ready to go—some people working on them are in this Telegram channel and will probably loudly announce them when they’re ready.

  3. You can buy Grin OTC if you are purchasing in blocks larger than $100,000 USD, although depending on price you’re going to have to wait a bit on delivery because at 1 grin per second, there are only 86,400 Grins produced every 24 hours. Many OTC brokers are also hanging out in the above telegram channel and can onboard you.

Before you do any of those things though, I’d urge everyone to wait at least a few days before making any big purchases, to allow pricing to stabilize. Those around for Zcash’s launch remember that the constrained supply in the first few days caused a massive price spike, which then crashed, and began a much more steady claim weeks leader. I’d recommend everyone check the prices on Galleon (and any other exchanges that list) and let there be a little bit of liquidity before jumping in.

Bitcoin & Friends

Daniel from Grin

Aviv from Spacemesh

JZ from Decred

Izaak from Coda

  • Numerous changes were made to support the new snarkitecture. Preliminary benchmarks show that prover performance is improved by about 40% across the board after switching from Groth--Maller to Groth16 in certain places.

  • We're now generating coda documentation using OCamlDoc.

  • Windowing for the Pedersen hash was implemented, speeding up performance by about 60%.

  • Coda now builds natively on Mac OS after some modifications to libsnark, which should make development and use a lot easier for those running on Mac OS.

  • We welcome Rebekah Mercer to the Coda team. Rebekah is a researcher in cryptography and cryptocurrency, most recently working on the QuisQuis anonymous cryptocurrency protocol.

Privacy coins

Paige & Zooko from Zcash

Smart contracting platforms

Mike from Loom

Myles from EOS

  • EOS referendum system-level contract goes live! 

  • EOSInfra launches freemium dApp infrastructure service

  • EOS New York launches Transit API to connect dApps to multiple signature providers

  • dfuse debuts new product for searching blockchain data

  • EOSBet details its new account system 

Kate and Dean from Agoric

Proof of Work #50

One day in crypto, one year in the real world

Happy Year of the Pig! Huge amount of exciting stuff in this update, including a mega-update from folks working on Grin, Handshake inching closer to launch, and a revamp of DDEX after moving off of the 0x smart contract system.

Ethereum Classic, a fork of Ethereum that was created after the DAO incident which the main Ethereum chain rolled back, appears to have been the victim of a 51% attack. At the moment it’s unclear if there were any successful double spends as a result of the attack, but it’s yet another a wakeup call to all exchanges listing proof of work forks with low amounts of chain security that the cost of doing so may very well exceed the benefits.

I had a really fun meeting with one of the folks at Cloudflare about potential ways that Cloudflare could support Handshake for resolving HNS domains and/or improving the security picture of DNSSEC. While not at all cryptocurrency related, I was blown away by all of the cool things Cloudflare is working on behind the scenes to keep the internet free and difficult to censor. I predict that over the next few years, a plethora of technologies including combination of techniques based on domain fronting, mixnets and onion routing, blockchain-based domain resolution a la handshake etc will lead to the internet being extraordinarily hard to censor. One caveat I’d mention here is that if you are a government that is OK with just wholesale blocking huge sectors of the public web (e.g. China) almost none of the above techniques can do much to stop you. However in more liberal states where blocking huge swathes of internet traffic isn’t an option, we’re getting closer and closer to an uncensorable internet.

Bitcoin & Friends

Daniel from Grin

Tieshun and Sean on Handshake

  • A new proof of work proposal for Handshake has been added to the hsd repo: KMAC+Blake2b-256, replacing cuckoo cycle

  • The Urkel team has built and released a gorgeous block explorer for Handshake, viewable here

  • Goosigs based airdrop of HNS coins to github developers is being audited

Jimmy on Bitcoin

Aviv from Spacemesh

JZ from Decred

Johnny from Stellar

  • We're going to skip this week - we had a lot of folks on vacation for the holidays, and look forward to providing larger updates as of next week!

Izaak from Coda

  • First and foremost, we have completed the initial implementation of "succintified" Ouroboros Praos, running for hundreds of blocks before hitting a snag. Over the next few weeks, we'll be working out the bugs and testing rigorously. We're very excited to share what is essentially the most sustainable and scalable blockchain ever implemented!

  • The implementation of the ate pairing in snarky is complete, an essential component for recursive composition in our new highly optimized snarkitecture.

  • We welcome Matthew Ryan to our team. Matthew is our first engineer working solely on snarky, making it easier to use and more efficient. He's already done some great work on macros to improve the developer experience and a flame chart generator for profiling R1CSs.

  • Finally if you haven't already, check out this blog post from Coda engineer Brandon Kase on the data structure we use to achieve both excellent latency and throughput in Coda.

Privacy coins

Paige & Zooko from Zcash

Diego and Riccardo from Monero

  • Some Monero community members (including the Monero Research Lab) have started a new series called "Breaking Monero" where we go over weaknesses of the protocol. You can watch the introduction here: https://youtu.be/WOyC6OB6ezA

Smart contracting platforms

Evan from Ethereum

Myles from EOS

Zaki from Cosmos

  • Game of Stakes is going really well. We've seen a rounds of low hanging fruit attacks on the mempool and adaptation with defense. The network is working well crossing 30k blocks. We continue to learn a lot from the stress testing. We planning an upgrade hard fork.  The best place to watch action is StargazerHubble and BigDipper.

  • We are mostly in the mode of polishing the code for the mainnet launch, preparing features for the first post launch upgrade. We strongly recommend looking at our F1 proof of stake distribution spec. It can offer major user experience improvements to any proof of stake blockchain.

  • We disclosed a critical vulnerability on the Cosmos SDK this week.  If you are using the SDK or Tendermint in production, please get in touch so we can improve our coordinated disclosure posture.

Kate and Dean from Agoric

Proof of Work #49

Forks, upgrades, and incentives

Hi folks. Shorter updates this week because some teams are on vacation early, but we should have full updates from everyone next week. The Proof of Work forum is now live! I was stoked to see a bunch of my favorite people register accounts: anything posted there is going to be seen by a lot of the biggest players in crypto, so if you write something interesting please post it there. If you don’t have an account yet, please apply here, and mention you’re a PoW reader next to whatever URL you place in the URL field (Twitter, etc); I’ll personally approve your account.

Back in September (PoW 37) I wrote about how I was worried that many useful projects in crypto would be unable to capture the value they create for their users, and said of ZRX:

“the value proposition for ZRX is somewhat esoteric. It’s theoretically used as a governance mechanism for avoiding contentious forks. If this is indeed valuable in the sense that it captures value, it’s certainly difficult to value in the sense of determining a number of satoshis that a ZRX token is worth.”

It would appear that the governance case for the ZRX token is, at least in the short-term, not convincing to relayers, as DDEX has decided to fork the 0x contracts and leave the ZRX token behind. Tian, the DDEX founder, writes:

Although we are using the term “fork” to give proper credit, we rewrote a large portion of the codebase. We plan to ship a new order schema, an engine capable of true matching, robust market orders, and a fundamentally different liquidity sharing model. The ZRX token will be removed as well, because fee-based tokens create unnecessary friction.

I think this substantially invalidates the idea that a token can derive huge amounts of value from being used as a voting ticket in governance decisions—to get a bit deep into the weeds on this specific case, if the “carrot” is shared liquidity, the ZRX token should only be worth whatever the delta is between just using a market-making bot to arb liquidity over from other relayers vs. sharing liquidity at the smart contract level. I think it’s not unlikely that the 0x team finds another interesting way to create value for the ZRX token, and I’m glad to see the design-space for token economic systems begin to be refined.

There’s a persistent but incorrect feeling among newcomers to crypto that protocols like Ethereum or other newer cryptocurrencies are under more active development than Bitcoin, but that isn’t the case—rather, Bitcoin development is more focused on optimizing the existing system than adding features. The folks at Bitcoin Optech have a fantastic newsletter of their own that details Bitcoin dev work weekly, and you can subscribe here.

Bitcoin & Friends

Daniel from Grin

  • Full on mainnet preparation mode, with mainly bug fixes and tweaks going in. Details around some of those fixes are outlined here.

  • 25 Pull Requests were merged in the past week, by 8 unique contributors.

  • The notes from the latest developer meeting. We're launching what will be the permanent betanet next week, practicing genesis block release process.

  • More Grin info here.

Tieshun And Sean on Handshake

  • Namebase, the first Handshake domain exchange has implemented a KYC flow, and also published an annotated version of the Handshake whitepaper

  • Moniker - a wrapper which makes interacting with Handshake domains easier released

  • Nomenclate, an indexing server for Handshake auctions, updated to v0.5.0, reaching near feature-parity with ElectrumX.

  • HNScan integrated with Nomenclate to support address balances, histories, and auction history.

  • Handshake Academy released.

Eric on Bitcoin

  • Pieter Wuille, Gregory Maxwell, and Gleb Naumenko continue to work on optimizing transaction relay, and have released a new library minisketch that allows for cleverly optimized passing-around of diffs in a way that reduces the overhead involved in transaction relaying.

  • Anthony Towns sketches out what a Schnorr/Taproot soft fork might look like.

Aviv from Spacemesh

  • We've released a new version of our gossip protocol with some optimizations and refactoring

  • We've refactored our dependency fetching mechanism and created a new environment setup script for easier on boarding

  • Work has continued on modeling the new Hare protocol Say hello to our new open MVP1 product board where you can see our progress on the road to Spacemesh MVP1 product code-complete milestone)

  • Published revision 0.2 of the Spacemesh App design for desktop class screens Published tests implementing the core Spacemesh Wallet security design - Basic BLS key derivation from random seed, 12 words mnemonic for paper backups and wallet file user pin protection via KDF2 and AES

  • Integrated a high-performance WASM BLS signatures library and put together some tests to demonstrating usage pattern Published draft of the Spacemesh API for connecting the Wallet with the Spacemesh blockmesh

  • Full update https://spacemesh.io/weekly-updates/

JZ from Decred

  • We cut a release candidate for Decrediton v1.4 as well as the CLI tools late on Friday, if you have the stomach for it feel free to put it through its paces and file issues if they are encountered.

  • Ledger added Decred support to their Nano S and Blue hardware wallets as well as the new Ledger Live wallet marking our second hardware wallet integration. I expect we'll be supporting the Ledger in Decrediton v1.5. For those who want to try out our Trezor support, it's included in Decrediton v1.4.

  • Dcrdata v3.1.0 was released and includes tons of bug fixes and performance improvements. It also reimplements the Insight API. Makes you wonder why all block explorers aren't written from scratch in Go. You can try it out on mainnet now.

  • Issue 8 of the Politeia Digest was released. Quick recap: stakeholders are basically being tight with the purse strings, which is actually quite nice to see.

Izaak from Coda

  • If you're looking for something to do on your commute, cleaning your apartment, etc, look no further than last week's Zero Knowledge podcast with myself and Evan. Hopefully it helps demystify SNARKs and how Coda uses them in creating a succinct blockchain.

  • We welcome senior cryptographer Vanishree Rao to the Coda team. Vanishree comes to us from Intertrust and was previously a research scientist at Xerox PARC following her PhD with Amit Sahai at UCLA.

  • Check out the new video of the scaling panel we sat on at Octobers' Scalar Summit. Lots of good insights about the obstacles to scaling crypto.

  • On the development front, we closed 29 PRs over the last week as part of an effort to overhaul Coda's fork management logic

Privacy coins

Paige & Zooko from Zcash

  • New Release: 2.0.2

  • New post: Zcash Network Upgrade Pipeline explains the process by which zcash safely ships hard-fork network upgrades

  • Sapling Cryptography Validation resources were posted for those interested in independently verifying the security of Zcash’s core components

Smart contracting platforms

Kate and Dean from Agoric

  • This week, we continued work on the least authority module system for JavaScript with partners from academia and industry.

  • We also continued work on compiling XS (Moddable’s JavaScript engine) into WASM for use with the Substrate runtime system.

  • We updated our eslint config package for Jessie (our subset of JavaScript for smart contracts) to include better error messages and tests. We also built a testing utility for eslint configs that can be used separately.

Financial Infrastructure

Lazar from MARKET Protocol

  • This week we released v0.6 of MPX, which included a number of bug fixes and new features. Highlights from this release:

    • Added privacy mode support for MetaMask

    • Upgraded web3.js to latest beta version 1.0.0

    • Added price cap and floor to the contract state

  • We are looking for user feedback on this release, let us know your thoughts by completing our user survey.

  • Last week we announced the newest addition to our advisory team – Erik Voorhees, founder and CEO of ShapeShift! Check out our blog for the full announcement.

Layer two and interoperability

Paul from Veil

Proof of Work #48

Don't call it a comeback!

Hi from a plane en-route back to the US from Tokyo! I’m finally done with an epic fundraising trip throughout Asia and can get back to doing what I really enjoy: reading and writing about the most interesting stuff happening in the decentralized infrastructure and money world.

In my absence, a lot of interesting stuff has been developed. Grin is inching closer to release, and there’s beginning to be a real interest in China for mining it. The mining industry itself in China is in the process of undergoing a consolidation driven by the dip in prices, and many smaller miners have been completely forced out of business. Those that survive have the best margins, both in the form of cheap electricity, capital, and mining equipment. These hardcore survivors are currently hanging on for dear life, but are also accumulating a huge advantage in terms of hashpower that will end up being very profitable when the price picks up again. New competitors are also emerging in the chip design sector of the mining field, most notably Whatsminer (神马矿机) a new entrant that has surprised everyone with incredibly efficient and powerful miners, posing a real threat to the incumbency of Bitmain.

During a fundraising meeting, I was asked by the founder of one of the top pharma companies in the world (i.e. someone who has a deep understanding of a capital-intensive industry but is basically new to crypto) what the most basic point of cryptocurrencies is. I explained that I feel (along with a lot of other people excited about this tech) that we’re currently living in an anomalous period where a bunch of centralized gatekeepers and middlemen have monopolized control over the money systems of the world, and use that control both to extract massive profits in the form of inflation and transaction fees, and also to decide who gets to send money to whom. As it turns out, keeping the benefits of digitized money but shaking off those centralized middlemen is difficult technical problem, the solutions to which seem to have a bunch of interesting side applications for designing systems to allocate scarce resources (names, storage, bandwidth etc.) Cryptocurrency, i.e. money based on a mathematically secured ledger, is not a philosophically new thing, but rather a return to the status quo we’ve had for millenia, where individuals and organizations deal directly with each-other, and no one has panoptic insight into the commerce of the world economy. During market downturns such as this one, I think it’s helpful to keep this very basic and almost boring fact in mind.

Finally, a quiet announcement of something that might not be quite ready, but should be fun to play around with: we’ve created a forum for PoW readers to discuss the most interesting things in cryptocurrency. You won’t find vapid “partnership announcements” or talk about which dinosaur-like incumbent has filed for what futile blockchain patent, but instead can read every day about new interesting technical developments in the blockchain space. The forum will start as invite-only (some of our earliest readers and friends have already gotten invites) and will slowly expand as we make sure our moderation team can handle the volume. If you haven’t gotten an invite and you’d like one, feel free to request one here!

Bitcoin & Friends

Daniel from Grin

Grin is a privacy-focused coin based on the Mimblewimble protocol being built by a pseudonymous team of developers

  • 25 Pull Requests were merged in the past week, by 7 unique contributors.

  • The notes from the last governance meeting. We're conducting two security audits, one tba on the libsecp fork, and another by Quarkslab on the key Grin crates.

  • Grin v0.4.2 was released.

  • PR#2052: Keybase is now supported as a wallet plugin to do transaction building with.

  • wallet713 community project announced, standalone wallet with integrated transaction relay.

  • 3rd Grin London Meetup announced, Jan 8.

  • More Grin info here.

Jimmy on Bitcoin

Bitcoin is.

Aviv from Spacemesh

Spacemesh is a fair programmable cryptocurrency powered by a novel proof-of-space-time  consensus protocol.

  • Initial version POET GO prover and verifier merged

  • First version of the Tortoise protocol merged

  • first commit of the new Hare protocol message structure

  • First version of the gossip protocol merged

  • Preliminary design of Spacemesh global state and transaction processor

  • Sync protocol implementation PR

JZ from Decred

Decred is a coin based on Bitcoin, but with a proof of stake addition, and a raft of additional features focusing on governance of the protocol by users with stake.

  • The latest issue of the Decred Journal is out covering everything that transpired during November in terms of development and community, as always discussion about it is taking place on the Decred subreddit.

  • Politeia Digest issue 7was released this week as well, Richard has also started including stats about the treasury.

  • "Treasury balance: 588,681 DCR (approx +16,718 DCR/month) — $11.8 million (+$335k/month) based on $20 DCR price". While the so-called "crypto winter" seems to be taking its toll on other projects, Decred is unaffected due to our sustainable funding model. And we are still looking for talented devs to join us.

  • Snapshot ofpublic Decred dev activity for November: 266 active PRs, 268 commits, 45K additions & 25K deletions across 3-11 devs per repo.

James from Summa

Summa is building tools for trust-minimized transactions across different blockchains.

  • While at ETHSingapore, James hacked together a Bitcoin light client. Look for it to be open sourced later this week 🎈

  • We have our regularly scheduled ETH auction on Thursday. Looking forward to seeing you there 👋

Johnny from Stellar

Stellar is a protocol that uses a quorum-based consensus (totally different from Proof of Work or Stake) to enable cheap transactions in the native coin, and allow for the issuance of assets.

  • Our contact at Stellar is on vacation, updates to resume next week

Privacy coins

Paige & Zooko from Zcash

Zcash is a coin based on Bitcoin but focused on privacy for users based on zk-SNARK transactions to hide senders and recipients

Smart contracting platforms

Myles from EOS

EOS is a smart-contracting protocol utilizing distributed proof of stake and a smaller number of nodes to enable the higher throughput necessary for dAPP type applications

Zaki from Cosmos

Cosmos is a proof-of-stake based system enabling interchain connectivity through hubs, and allowing for zone-based dapps to have inherently stable and economically viable ecosystems.

  • Game of Stakes finally launches

  • I wrote up a very technical breakdown of Cosmos vs Polkadot

  • Blocklayer released ChainKit a new tool for developers building Comsos zones that makes building testnets easy.

  • Tendermint is working with Kava to bring the Interledger Protocol to Cosmos and providing liquidity as an API to cosmos zones.

Kate and Dean from Agoric

Agoric is a new platform that uses an object-capability model and a restricted subset of javascript to make smart contracting easy.

  • We are working with the Moddable team to retarget their XS JavaScript engine to WASM. We can use this tiny and reliable embedded JS engine for smart contracts!

  • We are working with partners at Salesforce, Node.js, Carnegie Mellon, and others to design a module system for JavaScript that enables bringing in third party code safely.

Financial Infrastructure

Antonio from dYdX

Proof of Work #47

Downturns, forks, and jetlag, oh my!

Hi from Boston via Shanghai! I now exist in a state of perpetual jetlag—once we’re done fundraising, I intend to completely abstain from all forms of travel faster than a camel for a while, in order to let my battered circadian system have a chance at recovery.

I’ve added short descriptions of each project (in italics beneath the names) to help people who have recently joined the newsletter catch up.

A brief word on the recent market downturn: when people ask me why the market is up or down, I honestly don’t have a clue. When we tell people our fund is long-term focused, that isn’t an ideological or moral stance; it’s just that we have no clue why or how the market is going to move in the short term, but have a lot of conviction about where it’s going in the long term. This is something that’s easy to talk about, but hard to actually do. One of my BTC whale friends, who has over 100,000 BTC made a point that sounds almost syllogistically obvious but which I think is worth thinking about: “it’s really hard to hold BTC through serious dips—look at how few people actually did it!” Of all the early holders, only a small few actually held on long enough to not exit too early, or during a big dip.

The Bitcoin Cash fork drama has also been interesting. One objection I’ve heard from non-crypto people to the idea that Bitcoin is truly 0-inflation eventually is that forks themselves should be thought of as inflating the Bitcoin supply. However, Bitcoin Cash is certainly the most credible Bitcoin fork, but within a single year it’s gone from being thought of by some as a credible competitor to having its own forking event which seems likely to be very value-destructive for it. Bitcoin Cash itself was able to be a schelling point for people who wanted to try big blocks in Bitcoin, but it’s unclear what kind of consensus people who support B-ABC vs B-SV would come to. My prediction is that the ultimate destiny of most forks is to be worth nothing, and for that fact to cause a decrease in the number of forks as would-be forkers realize there’s little to nothing in it for them.

Two quick notes about PoW itself: Someone asked why we don’t try the paid-subscription model given that some other crypto newsletters are pulling in hundreds of thousands annually. The answer is that PoW will always be free (and ad free!) because there’s no way to make money from it that doesn’t make it worse. Someone else asked how many of the projects featured in PoW have we invested in. At press, the answer is less than 25%. I feature in PoW anything I think is interesting, but that doesn’t always align with what I think will make money (for example, some projects had valuations that were too high for my taste, or some other projects I just didn’t know about when they were raising!)

As always, thanks very much for reading this, and please get in touch if you have ideas for how to make it better, or a project you’d like to see featured!

Bitcoin & Friends

James from Summa

Summa is building tools for trust-minimized transactions across different blockchains.

  • On the 18th we wrapped up the first ever cross-chain auction. We sold 10 NFTs for BTC during a 3 day event

  • We used intentional double-spends and stateless SPV proofs to make a trustless Dtutch auction

  • Over the next two weeks we'll be refining the UI. We expect to have another live auction event around the end of the month

Daniel from Grin

Grin is a privacy-focused coin based on the Mimblewimble protocol being built by a pseudonymous team of developers

Jimmy on Bitcoin

Bitcoin is the big daddy

Aviv from Spacemesh

Spacemesh is a coin and smart-contracting protocol utilizing on a storage-based proof of work called Proof of Space-Time.

  • No update, big one next week.

JZ from Decred

Decred is a coin based on Bitcoin, but with a proof of stake addition, and a raft of additional features focusing on governance of the protocol by users with stake.

  • Dustin has written up a piece thoroughly detailing how the Politeia process worked during our first round of votes. Richard has also released issue 4 of the Politeia Digest.

  • Zubair published an overview of the Decred on-chain consensus mechanism, especially timely considering the recent drama we've seen in the space as new coins are born through conflict, leading to confusion and schisms in communities.

  • Lots of dev activity as usual with 2 PRs for dcrd, 14 for dcrdata, 13 for politeiagui, 6 for politeia, 11 for decrediton, and 4 for dcrwallet. New alpha and beta releases are up for dcrdata as well, for those who like to live dangerously.

Johnny from Stellar

Stellar is a protocol that uses a quorum-based consensus (totally different from Proof of Work or Stake) to enable cheap transactions in the native coin, and allow for the issuance of assets.

  • The major rewrite of the data layer in stellar-core has been finally merged in: https://github.com/stellar/stellar-core/pull/1788

  • We're aiming for a pre-release before the winter holidays

  • Horizon (ed: stellars client facing API) 0.15.1 has been released, with a memory leak fix.

  • New Horizon stats initialization command added to alleviate issues (horizon db init-asset-stats)

  • CAP-0013 is open for comment, and is another iteration on handling the current pain with sending assets without a trustline.

  • Discussion is beginning around how Stellar works within the context of sub-networks with different features and functionality.

Izaak from Coda

Coda is a project focused on high-scalability enabled by recursive zk-SNARKs

  • The Coda team is hiring for a bunch of senior-level positions. In particular, we're hiring product managers, engineering managers, a head of business development, and a community manager. Check out our jobs page for more details.

  • Delegation of stake for our proof of stake consensus mechanism was implemented in a series of PRs (11481124).

  • We finished the redesign and initial scaffolding for our new system for managing forks and the state required on each one of them.

Privacy coins

Paige & Zooko from Zcash

Zcash is a coin based on Bitcoin but focused on privacy for users based on zk-SNARK transactions to hide senders and recipients

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